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Yue Feng
Professor


Emory University School of Medicine
Department of Pharmacology
5029 Rollins Research Center
1510 Clifton Road 
Atlanta, GA 30322-3090


Phone : 404-727-0351
Fax     : 404-727-0365
Lab     : 404-727-3230

Email: yfeng@emory.edu
Research Area:
Posttranscriptional regulation in normal brain function, development and brain diseases
Research Interests:
We are interested in how RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs govern the normal brain development and function, and how posttranscriptional dysregulation at the steps of mRNA biogenesis and translation leads to malfunction of neurons and glia, which underlies many mental and neurological diseases. Taking a multidisciplinary strategy and a combination of molecular, cellular and pharmacological approaches, our current research focuses on the following directions:

(1) Translation regulation in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and mental disorders
Rapid and accurate regulation of protein synthesis in brain neurons, especially at the synapses, is a critical mechanism that governs neuronal network development, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive function. We have a long standing interest in the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a selective RNA-binding protein controls mRNA translation whose absence leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability. We are currently investigating various mRNA targets of FMRP to elucidate how FMRP collaborates with microRNAs to control neuronal translation in response to developmental and synaptic signals and how FMRP deficiency leads to abnormal synaptic development and plasticity.
Moreover, we have recently launched on an exciting new project to delineate regulation of translation and homeostasis of the mRNAs encoding the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is a key factor controlling a broad spectrum of brain function whose dysregulation causes numerous neurological and cognitive disorders.  We are currently investigating how RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs control BDNF production under physiological and pathological neuronal activity changes represented by that in epilepsy.

(2) mRNA homeostasis in myelination and white matter diseases
We currently focus on the selective RNA-binding protein QKI, a key factor controlling proliferation and differentiation of myelin producing glia and myelin formation in response to developmental signals.  Emerging evidence indicated the involvement of QKI function in several human diseases, including myelin repair in multiple sclerosis, white matter defects in schizophrenia, and glioma tumorigenesis. We have established state-of-the-art molecular and cellular tools and genetically engineered animal models, which allowed us to identify a sophisticated molecular cascade that controls alternative splicing, stability, localization and translation of numerous mRNA targets of QKI in normal myelinogenesis, neural protection and pathogenesis of myelin disorders. Moreover, we are taking, genetic and pharmacological approaches to manipulate QKI function to promote myelin regeneration.
Education:
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University
Postdoctoral Fellow/Research Associate, Emory University
Research Assistant Professor, Emory University, 1995-1998
Assistant Professor, Emory University, 1999-2005
Associate Professor, Emory University, 2005—Present

DEPARTMENT FOCUS

Image courtesy of the Pavlath Lab

Image courtesy of the Feng Lab

Mouse dentate granule cell region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Mouse dentate hilus region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Image courtesy of the Feng Lab

Hippocampal CA3 4 days after status epilepticus. blue - cell nuclei; green -  astrocytes; red - microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Mouse hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Mouse hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Image courtesy of the Traynelis Lab

Image courtesy of the Feng Lab

Mouse hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Image courtesy of the Hepler Lab

Hippocampal CA1 4 days after status epilepticus in COX2 cKO. blue - cell nuclei; green -  astrocytes; red - microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Image courtesy of the Pavlath Lab

01 January 2015
Congratulations, to Rita Nahta, Ph.D., and co-authors on an excellent article entitled “Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1...
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20 June 2014
Researchers from Ohio State, Emory receive grants from Harrington Discovery Institute and Alzheimer's Drug Discovery...
03 February 2015
TBA
10 February 2015
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17 February 2015
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24 February 2015
Rosa Puertollano, PhD, Senior Investigator, Cell Biology & Physiology...
"Lysosomes As Novel Regulators of Nutrient Sensing and Energy...
03 March 2015
TBA
10 March 2015
Andrew Napper, PhD, Dept. of Biology, University of Delaware
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17 March 2015
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24 March 2015
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31 March 2015
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07 April 2015
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14 April 2015
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21 April 2015
Matthew Torres, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Biology, Georgia ...
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28 April 2015
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05 May 2015
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12 May 2015
No Seminar due to Emory Graduation
19 May 2015
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26 May 2015
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For questions regarding this website, please contact Olga Rivera at orivera@pharm.emory.edu