• Welcome to Pharmacology

  • Image courtesy of the Feng Lab

  • Hippocampal CA1 4 days after status epilepticus in COX2 cKO. blue-cell nuclei; green-astrocytes; red-microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab

  • Image courtesy of the Hepler Lab

  • Image courtesy of the Pavlath Lab

  • Image courtesy of the Traynelis Lab

Department Focus

 Lab Image

Hippocampal CA3 4 days after status epilepticus. blue - cell nuclei; green -  astrocytes; red - microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

 Lab Image

Mouse dentate hilus region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

 Lab Image

Mouse hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Pavlath image

Image Courtesy of the Pavlath Lab

Feng Lab Image

Image Courtesy of the Feng Lab

Pavlath Lab Image

Image Courtesy of the Pavlath Lab

Feng Lab Image

Image courtesy of the Feng Lab

Feng Lab Image

Image Courtesy of the Feng Lab

Hepler Lab Image

Image courtesy of the Hepler Lab

 Lab Image

Mouse dentate hilus region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Traynelis Lab image

Image Courtesy of the Traynelis Lab

Feng Lab Image

Image Courtesy of the Feng Lab

Dingledine Lab Image

Mouse hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Dingledine Lab Image

Mouse hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after status epilepticus. Blue = cell nuclei; green = astrocytes; red = microglia. Courtesy of Dingledine lab.

Pharmacology Seminars

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Chair's welcome

Raymond J. DingledinePharmacology as a modern field exists to lay the groundwork for discovery and development of the next generation of therapeutics. Pharmacology emerged long ago as a basic science discipline from attempts to discover how the age-old remedies and poisons exert their effects on man. Today the science of pharmacology would be nearly unrecognizable to its predecessors as high throughput screens of small molecules feed programs involving patch clamp electrophysiology, genetic manipulations and detailed biochemical pathway analyses to develop better understanding of the molecular causes of disease and pinpoint sites amenable to intervention. There is a continuing societal need for high-impact pharmacologists who understand the underpinnings of modern therapeutic strategies. These individuals will find careers within academic, pharmaceutical and governmental laboratories to develop and study tomorrow's drugs. Departmental faculty work with approximately 90 graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and staff on a variety of research and clinical targets that include epilepsy, cardiovascular and muscle diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, inflammation and drug abuse. How cells regulate important signal transduction molecules such as the P450 metabolizing enzymes, protein kinases, intracellular scaffolding proteins, glutamate and other neurotransmitter receptors are woven into these studies. Collaborative research projects with faculty in clinical departments such as Neurology, Psychiatry, Ophthalmology, Human Genetics and Medicine enhance our research and training environment.

Raymond Dingledine, PhD Professor and Chair

Research Highlights

Candice Junge's Trajectory from Emory Pharmacology to Amgen

Candice Junge

As a graduate student in the Emory University Molecular and Systems Pharmacology (MSP) program, Candice Junge PhD worked with Steve Traynelis exploring the role of PAR-1 receptors in brain injury following stroke. Upon graduation in 2003 she was considered the world's leading authority on PAR-1 receptors in cerebral stroke...in mice. To be sure the science was rock solid, but where do you go next? She took her training to southern California and after a brief postdoc in neurobiology at UCLA, Candice made her first step into the bioscience industry.  After a few moves, she serves today as the Development Design Director at Amgen. I caught up with Candice to chat briefly about her interesting and rewarding career path since leaving Emory.

Click here to read full story.

Haian Fu Appointed Winship Partner in Research Endowed Chair

Haian Fu

Congratulations to Winship investigator Haian Fu, PhD for being named the Winship Partner in Research Endowed Chair. A dedication ceremony to honor Fu took place February 23 with colleagues and friends in attendance. This endowed chair was established within Winship to support the overall achievements of Fu and his contributions to Winship, the Emory School of Medicine and Emory University.

Pictured: Raymond Dingledine, PhD, Walter J. Curran, Jr., MD, Haian Fu, PhD, and Christian P. Larsen, MD, DPhil.

Click here to read full story.

Grad Student Spotlight: Brilee Coleman at Emory University

Brilee Coleman

Brilee Coleman, a current Molecular and Systems Pharmacology graduate student at Emory University, initially struggled to find the right graduate program to fit her interests. Brilee experienced difficulty finding updated and relevant program information; she also came from a very small chemistry undergraduate program, where the advising team wasn’t equipped to help place her into a more specialized neuroscience graduate program she thought she was interested in.

Click here to read more about Brilee’s search and application process to graduate schools, including what she’s learned and tips for being successful for future grad school applicants.